Sunday, February 24, 2013

Gung Hay Fat Choy! Happy New Year!

Chinese New Year marks the end of winter and the beginning of spring.  It is celebrated with family reunions, and marked as a time to honour deities as well as ancestors. It is a time to thank the gods for their blessings. The New Year was celebrated on this past February 10th.

Traditionally, families make great preparations for the changing of the year. Prior to the new year, families settle their debts and purchase new clothes, houses are cleaned and feasts are prepared.
It is common to see homes filled with flowers and fruit, including oranges, tangerines, and pomeloes. Their colours symbolize good luck and joy. Flower blossoms symbolize longevity and courage.

Some Chinese believe that if flowers blossom on New Year's Day good fortune will be theirs for the next year. Trays filled of candied melon, coconut, lotus seed  and watermelon seed are served.

Seven days into the New Year everyone adds a year to their age regardless of when they were born.  In traditional China individual birthdays were not considered as important as this New Year's date.

Here are wishes for growth, good health, abundance and togetherness, happiness, love and prosperity.
May everything be according to your wishes. Happy New Year! Gung Hay Fat Choy!

2013 Year of the Snake
Today is day 24 of the thirty day writing challenge (February edition) as arranged and hosted by Nicky and Mike over at WeWorkForCheese.com. Go check out their site to see who else is participating and read some more great stories.

23 comments:

  1. But...uh...if they purchase new clothes, they are in debt again all year, right?

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  2. We actually celebrated Christmas with my kids and tiny gandkids on Chinese New Year because we'd been out of the country at Christmas and I'd been sick since we came back. That day easily added a day to my life.

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    1. I went and got married of Chinese New Year.

      Any reason to gather the family around is a good reason.
      It's amazing what some positive energy can do the body.

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  3. "Gung Hay Fat Choy" to you too, Shawn!

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  4. Very nice post! It's great to see positive vibes.

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  5. I enjoyed learning about the Chinese New Year and the family traditions. It all sounds very positive and life-affirming. Well, except for adding a year to one's age every year. I'm getting there fast enough, thank you.

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    1. Well, the bonus is, if you only started counting birthdays on this Chinese New Year, you get to start at 20.

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  6. The first New Year's stunk and now I have to do it again? Sheesh. Maybe something good can happen?

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  7. Well this was very informative and very interesting. :) I think I'm going to adopt this way of thinking and just forget about my real birthday. ;)

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    1. Right. We'll see what happens when that rolls around.

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    2. I forgot your real birthday. This way I'll know when to send a gift.

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  8. This year, I ate in a really good Thai restaurant the night before Chinese New Year. I hope that's okay.

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    1. As OK as eating Mexican food to celebrate the 4th of July. Just as long as you enjoyed it. :)

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  9. I was born in the Year Of The Badger. But between you and me, it's ALWAYS the Year Of The Badger. Indigo

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  10. Replies
    1. Don't worry. It comes around again in September.

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